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Canadian men lose second straight at ICC Under-19 Cricket World Cup

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BASSETERRE, Saint Kitts And Nevis — Canada lost its second straight match at the ICC Under-19 Men's Cricket World Cup, beaten Tuesday by 106 runs by England.

Canada won the toss and elected to field.

After Canadian fast bowler Parmveer Kharoud removed Jacob Bethell for seven with England at 26 for one, the English batting attack found its groove with opener George Thomas and captain Tom Prest combining for 90 runs.

Prest scored 93 before exiting. George Bell added 57 and Thomas 52 as England scored 320 runs at the expense of seven wickets in their 50 overs.

Kairav Sharma led Canada's bowlers with three wickets.

After losing opener Siddh Lad with just 14 runs on the board, Canada did not lose its second wicket until 60 runs later as Anoop Chima (38) and Yasir Mahmood (25) steadied the ship. But Chima, with Canada at 81 runs, was the first of four wickets to go quickly.

Gurnek Johal Singh had 44 runs and Ethan Gibson added 33 as Canada was all out at 214 in the 49th over.

Canada lost 49 runs to the United Arab Emirates in their opening Group A match Saturday. England defeated defending champion Bangladesh by even wickets.

The Canadians, who beat out Argentina, Bermuda and the U.S. to get to the tournament, face Bangladesh on Thursday.

Canada is making its fifth straight appearance — eighth overall — at the tournament. It has yet to make it past the first round, with an 11th-place finish in 2010 its best showing.

England, making its 14th tournament appearance, won the title in 1998 and finished third in 2014. It placed ninth last time out after facing a tough group that also featured Australia and the West Indies.

The 16 teams have been split into four groups with the top two in each advancing to the Super League and the remaining sides moving on to the Plate playoffs. The competition runs through Feb. 5 across four Caribbean countries.

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This report by The Canadian Press was first published Jan. 18, 2022.

The Canadian Press